Explore Slang English, English Idioms, and more!

Idiom of the day: At the drop of a hat. Meaning: Without any hesitation, instantly. #idiom #idioms #english #learnenglish

Idiom of the day: At the drop of a hat. Meaning: Without any hesitation, instantly. Example: I’d quit my job at the drop of a hat if I didn’t have a family to support.

Idiom of the day: Put your foot in it. Meaning: To say something by accident which embarrasses or upsets someone. Example: I really put my foot in it when I asked her how her husband was. I forgot that he died last year.

Idiom of the day: Put your foot in it. Meaning: To say something by accident which embarrasses or upsets someone. Example: I really put my foot in it when I asked her how her husband was. I forgot.

Idiom of the day: Drag your feet.  -         Repinned by Chesapeake College Adult Ed. We offer free classes on the Eastern Shore of MD to help you earn your GED - H.S. Diploma or Learn English (ESL) .   For GED classes contact Danielle Thomas 410-829-6043 dthomas@chesapeke.edu  For ESL classes contact Karen Luceti - 410-443-1163  Kluceti@chesapeake.edu .  www.chesapeake.edu

Idiom of the day: Drag your feet. Meaning: To do something slowly because you…

Idiom of the day: Armchair expert  Meaning: A person who knows a lot about a subject, but has little or no experience or real understanding of it.  Example:  - I can give you a lot of advice about driving.  - But you’ve never driven in your life, you’re...

Idiom of the day: Armchair expert Meaning: A person who knows a lot about a subject, but has little or no experience or real understanding of it. Example: - I can give you a lot of advice about driving. - But you’ve never driven in your life, you’re.

Idiom of the day: Get your foot in the door. Meaning: To make the first step toward a goal. #idiom #idioms #english #learnenglish

Idiom of the day: Get your foot in the door. Example: I think I could get the job if I could only get my foot in the door.

American Idioms

15 Essential English Idioms for Sounding Like a Native

American Idioms-----originated during battlefield surgery before chloroform was invented and the injured soldier or sailor was given a bullet to bite when nothing else was available to try to ease the pain. Probably some were swallowed.

Idiom of the day: Get cold feet.  Meaning: To suddenly become too afraid to do something.  Example: I was going to try bungee jumping, but I got cold feet.

Idiom of the day: Get cold feet. Meaning: To suddenly become too afraid to do something. Example: I was going to try bungee jumping, but I got cold feet.

Point The Finger At Someone

Idiom of the day: Point the finger at someone. Meaning: To blame someone. Example: Don’t point the finger at me!

get your wires crossed

Idiom of the day: Get your wires crossed. Meaning: To misunderstand someone. Example: Jenny got her wires crossed. I told her to email John, but she emailed James. Origin: This expression transfers a wrongly wired telephone or telegraph connection to.

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