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La Calle de Cuauhtemotzin (1941) by Emilio Bas Viaud (tendreams)

La Calle de Cuauhtemotzin (1941) by Emilio Bas Viaud (tendreams)

NEW OBJECTIVITY

New Objectivity: Modern German Art in the Weimar Republic,

Operation (1929) by Christian Schad (1894-1982), German--painter associated with Dada and the New Objectivity movement.Schad continued to paint in the 1950s in Magic Realist style and returned in the 1960s to experiments with photograms (wiki) - (Weimarart)

Operation by Christian Schad German--painter associated with Dada and the New Objectivity movement.Schad continued to paint in the in Magic Realist style and returned in the to experiments with photograms (wiki) - (Weimarart)

Theater Loge (c. 1930) by Karl Hubbuch (1891-1979), German - His drawings and prints of the early 1920s, sharply realistic in style, are highly critical of the social and economic order and he later became associated with New Objectivity (wiki) - (bjws)

Theater Loge (c. by Karl Hubbuch German - His drawings and prints of the early sharply realistic in style, are highly critical of the social and economic order and he later became associated with New Objectivity (wiki) - (bjws)

Melitta (1930) by Manfred Hirzel (1905-1932), Polish-born German associated with New Objectivity movement (bjws)

Melitta by Manfred Hirzel Polish-born German associated with New Objectivity movement (bjws)

Portrait of the Artist and his Wife (The Double Portrait) (1920) by Ubaldo Oppi (1889-1942), Italian-was largely self-taught, staying in Germany and Austria between 1907 and 1909, attending lessons of Klimt. He combined his experience of Secessionism with expressive elements and vibrant colors. Towards the end of the World War I he spent some time in Austrian captivity where he produced a series of drawings anticipating many design elements of the New Objectivity (Weimarart) (tendreams)

Portrait of the Artist and his Wife (The Double Portrait) (1920) by Ubaldo Oppi (1889-1942), Italian-was largely self-taught, staying in Germany and Austria between 1907 and 1909, attending lessons of Klimt. He combined his experience of Secessionism with expressive elements and vibrant colors. Towards the end of the World War I he spent some time in Austrian captivity where he produced a series of drawings anticipating many design elements of the New Objectivity (Weimarart) (tendreams)

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