Explore Black Manta, Manta Ray, and more!

How to quarter a deer in the field click right now how to quarter a deer in the field #stepbystep

I hate deer hunting! I cried when I saw an add for a game called deer hunting where you kill animals. I wish hunting didn't exist!

Lil Baby Beluga

Baby beluga in the deep blue sea. Swims so wild and he swims so free. Heaven above and the sea below And a little white whale on the go. Is your momma home? is your momma home?

Reflection time…What’s your New Year’s resolution?    Our New Year’s resolution is to continue to work to sustain wildlife and wild places through public education, participation in species survival projects, conservation research and support for critical conservation projects around the globe!

Welcome to Canada's most visited Zoo! Home to 707 animals from all corners of the globe, join us in an immersive experience to learn what makes each one special

rainforest jaguar

Leopard sleeping in tree 'The Sleeping Beauty', photo by Sudhir Shivaram, wildlife photos

Photograph Tadpoles by Bert Willaert on 500px — Designspiration

School of tadpoles of the Common toad (Bufo bufo) seen from below. By Bert Willaert on

smokey eye with gold eyeshadow

High Five with a Humpback Whale

Diver and whale high five by Marco Queral. I wanna give a whale a high-five!

A Heron on wet rocks near the water with a vibrant green pine tree backdrop

A Heron on wet rocks near the water with a vibrant green pine tree backdrop

La Nascita di Tartarughe Marine

My favorite thing- a boil! (baby sea turtles hatching and finding their way to the ocean)" data-componentType="MODAL_PIN

New on display, our own captive-raised Giant Black Jellyfish. Only 4 months old!

New on display, our own captive-raised Giant Black Jellyfish. Only 4 months old!

great capture..

Photo “lovely dinosaur” by mehmet karaca :) “A chameleon does not leave one tree (or flower) until he is sure of another” ~Arabian Proverb

The manta ray is a graceful swimmer, cruising the world’s temperate and tropical waters by flapping its large pectoral fins. When the mood strikes, however, those fins are used as wings to help launch the ray up to seven feet (two meters) in the air. Mantas have few predators—only large sharks—so it’s not known why they perform such aerial acrobatics.

A Manta Ray uses its fins as wings to help launch it up to seven feet (two meters) in the air Photograph by Ralph Lee Hopkins, National Geographic Via - Safarious

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