Explore Nikko, Ghost Hauntings, and more!

Explore related topics

iseo58:  Bake-Jizo Trail. Nikko, Japan. Circa 1925. The Bake-jizo (Ghost Jizo) Legend says that if you count them on your way up the trail and on your way back, you will end up with a different number.

BUDDHA~~❤ Bake Jizo Trail in Nikko, Japan, 1925 The Bake-jizo (Ghost Jizo) legend says that if you count them on your way up the trail and on your way back, you will end up with a different number.

This Jizo was commissioned, together with other five by a priest from Fukagawa called Shogen and the artist who made them was Ootasuruga no Kami Fujiwara Matayoshi from Kanda. #Asakusa, #Jizo, #Shogen, #Fujiwara, #Matayoshi 2/3 © Grigoris A. Miliaresis

This Jizo was commissioned, together with other five by a priest from Fukagawa called Shogen and the artist who made them was Ootasuruga no Kami Fujiwara Matayoshi from Kanda. © Grigoris A.

El Japón del siglo XIX, en color (FOTOS)

El Japón del siglo XIX, en color (FOTOS)

Photo, late 19th century, Japan.  Photographer unknown.  ”In the past, a kimono would often be entirely taken apart for washing, and then re-sewn for wearing. This traditional washing method is called ‘arai hari.’ Because the stitches must be taken out for washing, traditional kimonos needed to be hand sewn. Arai hari is very expensive and difficult and is now only done for high-end garments”. Image owned by Okinawa Soba,

mortisia: “ KIMONO DAYS — Japanese Women and Their Everyday Tools. The “Ironing Board” without the Iron. Actually, it’s better described as a “drying board”, I suppose. The wet kimono was “stuck” to.

"It was the summer of 1905. At the races in Auteuil (near Paris) a woman appeared wearing trousers in public for the first time. Her name is unknown, but this is a picture of her. Police men had to protect her against the curiosity and outrage of the crowd. "

A woman wore trousers in public for the first time, near Paris, summer of at the races in Auteuil. Her name is unknown, but this is a picture of her. Police men had to protect her against the curiosity and outrage of the crowd.

Ancient burial mound (kofun) in Nara. The fact that it is in the shape of a keyhole which can only be seen from the air might be a clue!

"Ancient burial mound (kofun) in Nara. The fact that it is in the shape of a keyhole which can only be seen from the air might be a clue.

Jizo temple at Asakusa Park, Tokyo, c.

The 6 Statues of Ojizosan, the most popular buddhist divinity in Japan. The protector of children and pilgrims and the guardian of souls suffering in the six hells of Buddhism, he is represented as a monk with a stick in his right hand or a jewel in his left. He often wears a red cap and a bib. Each one of those represents his qualities: long life, treasure place, treasure hand, land possession, treasure seal, strong determination. Those statues are the gatekeepers of the Manganji Temple.

The 6 Statues of Ojizosan, the most popular buddhist divinity in Japan.

Pinterest
Search