Explore The Celts, Celtic Nations, and more!

750 BC to 12 BC, Celts were most powerful people central northern Europe. Tribes of Celts, wave after wave, spread outwards, taking over France, Belgium, crossing to Britain. Celt comes from Greek: Keltoi, barbarians (pronounced "Kelt") Celt is a term NOT used until 18th century; Romans called these people Britons. Celtic Iron Age ended AD 43, Romans invaded Britain.

750 BC to 12 BC,Celts lived in central & northern Europe.They spread to France,Belgium and Britain. The Romans called these people Britons.The Celtic Iron Age ended when the Romans invaded Britain.

Early British Kingdoms presents a map of Britain as it may have appeared around AD 625 / 10,625 HE

A Map of Britain AD 525 © Nash Ford Publishing - The Saxons settlements expand a little in the far North and in Sussex and Wessex, notably taking over the Isle of Wight.

celtic peoples - Google Search

Celtic Europe 1850 BC- AD 400 1850 BC: Celto-Ligurian culture 1600 BC: Bronze work 1200 BC: Urnfield Celts 600 BC: Iron work 390 BC: Celts sack Rome and enter history as "Gauls." 44 BC: A Roman army under Julius Caesar conquers Gaul.

It is clear that the formation of a Pictish nation that united the peoples of Scotland was due to the arrival of the Romans.

The 'kingdoms' of ancient Britain. Between 400 to 900 AD, from withdrawal of the Roman Empire until the ascension of Anglo-Saxon rule, the land we now call Britain was divided under the rule of many peoples. These tribes were banded together loosely

British Isles, around 920 showing the Viking Age

British Isles, around 920 showing the Viking Age. Mystery of History Volume Lesson 42

A study released last week shows that up to 40 per cent of our DNA may be from Germanic ancestors, and not the Vikings, thanks to the Anglo-Saxon migrations here in 450-600AD. The project is particularly interesting because it would seem that our genetic make-up bares out those old traditions and clichés about how we relate to each other. So the age-old rivalries between Devon and Cornwall – take for example the bitter wars fought over whether you put jam or cream on a scone first...

Ancient boundaries are the strongest

GENETIC BOUNDARIES: 'A pioneering study into [Britain's] genetic heritage . shows that up to 40 per cent of [British] DNA may be from Germanic ancestors, and not the Vikings, thanks to the Anglo-Saxon migrations in The project, carried out by

Map of Ancient Britain.

An Map of Ancient Britain provided by Peter L Kessler and depicting the tribal areas in Ancient Britain.

// a map of the 54 invasions of Great Britain (and "the places at which foreign troops have landed on British soil since 1066 (and all that), seen in the Illustrated London News for 27 March 1909)

Map of the 54 invasions of Great Britain (the places at which foreign troops have landed on British soil since 1066 (and all that), seen in the Illustrated London News for 27 March

Britain c. 802 was divided among competing groups, with most of England controlled by the Germanic Angles, Saxons & Jutes  and Scotland divided between the Picts (the kingdom of Fortriu) & the Gaels (the kingdom of Dalriada) from Ireland who together combined to form the basis of the Scottish nation. 'Britons' here means the Celtic peoples -- including the Welsh in Wales & the Cornish in Cornwall (here labeled 'West Wales') -- pushed out of England by the Germanic tribes.

Britain c. 802 was divided among competing groups, with most of England…

European Tribes and Kingdoms (ca. 600 AD)

Europe Tribes and Kingdoms - 600 AD Frankish Kingdom - named after me - bow down, peasants.

Predominant haplogroups across Europe and surroundings Maps on the Web: Photo

Genealogical DNA test - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - image shows y-DNA haplogroup distribution in Europe

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