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OligotrophicLake

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Acid Rain Has Turned Canadian Lakes into a Kind of Jelly

Acid Rain Has Turned Canadian Lakes into a Kind of Jelly

Lake Constance Information - Info about Lake Constance, Higlights & Photos, Pictures, Translation, What is going on

Lake Constance Information - Info about Lake Constance, Higlights & Photos, Pictures, Translation, What is going on

If I ever take up cross-stitch... Significantly Not Normal Cross-Stitch Pattern (Shapiro Wilk Test)

Significantly Not Normal Cross-Stitch Pattern (Shapiro Wilk Test)

If I ever take up cross-stitch... Significantly Not Normal Cross-Stitch Pattern (Shapiro Wilk Test)

The Nikon Small World Photomicrography Competition / A water flea (Daphnia sp.) and green algae (Volvox sp.) captured with darkfield and flash by Dr. Ralf Wagner of Dusseldorf, Germany. (Dr. Ralf Wagner)

Nikon Small World Photomicrography Competition

The Nikon Small World Photomicrography Competition / A water flea (Daphnia sp.) and green algae (Volvox sp.) captured with darkfield and flash by Dr. Ralf Wagner of Dusseldorf, Germany. (Dr. Ralf Wagner)

Daphnia magna A freshwater water flea is magnified 100 times in this photo by Joan Röhl of the University of Potsdam, Germany – enough to see the microscopic processes going on beneath its translucent skin.

Daphnia magna A freshwater water flea is magnified 100 times in this photo by Joan Röhl of the University of Potsdam, Germany – enough to see the microscopic processes going on beneath its translucent skin.

This extraordinary photo shows a random splash of seawater, magnified 25 times - Lost At E Minor: For creative people

This extraordinary photo shows a random splash of seawater, magnified 25 times

This extraordinary photo shows a random splash of seawater, magnified 25 times - Lost At E Minor: For creative people

Daphnia, Unfertilized eggs can be seen incubating along the back of this momma water flea. Female water fleas don’t need males to reproduce. Through a process called parthenogenesis, unfertilized eggs can develop into fully functional offspring. Male water fleas are only born in response to conditions of cold or drought, and when water fleas do mate, they produce a special kind of egg with tough protective shell, called a winter egg. Wim van Egmond

Mini Microbe Portraits From the Micropolitan Museum

Daphnia, Unfertilized eggs can be seen incubating along the back of this momma water flea. Female water fleas don’t need males to reproduce. Through a process called parthenogenesis, unfertilized eggs can develop into fully functional offspring. Male water fleas are only born in response to conditions of cold or drought, and when water fleas do mate, they produce a special kind of egg with tough protective shell, called a winter egg. Wim van Egmond

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