10 nombres de origen náhuatl (azteca) para niños.

10 nombres de origen azteca para niños

Personalized baby feet rings, the perfect silver rings to celebrate the family milestones in your lives.We carefully apply name and date of your choice to either side of the baby feet to create these beautiful, highly personal, celebration rings with birthstone.

Engraved Baby Feet Ring with Birthstone Platinum Plated

Personalized baby feet rings, the perfect silver rings to celebrate the family milestones in your lives.We carefully apply name and date of your choice to either side of the baby feet to create these beautiful, highly personal, celebration rings with birt

Joley Bean Designs, hospital door hanger, Aztec, arrows, feathers

Make two tops (one with boy name, one with girl name). Love the arrows but not the all pink fletching on top arrow. Navy or gray background. Have only one bottom ready to attach to either with ribbon.

Handmade Home Playroom

Turning Your Creative Hobby Into a Business:: The Handmade Home

The Jaramillo sisters Natalia (b. 1889) and Aurora (b. 1896) were from Albuquerque, New Mexico.  Exactly how they got into show business is unknown but it is this author's studied opinion that everything was done legally and with their parents full approval.      The first manager / owner of the Aztec children show was a fella named Jack Brown who began exhibiting the "twins" in 1902.

The history of the Freak Show and the legendary freaks who promoted the popular attractions - Altered Dimensions Paranormal

Mahuika is the Māori Fire Goddess. In some legends, she is the younger sister of Hine-nui-te-pō, Goddess of Death. It was from her that Māui obtained the secret of making fire. She married Auahi-Turoa and together they had five children, named for the five fingers on the human hand, called collectively Ngā Mānawa. The symbolism of this connection between fingers and fire is revealed in the stories where Māui obtains fire from Mahuika by tricking her into giving him her fingernails, one by…

Mahuika is the Māori Fire Goddess. In some legends, she is the younger sister of…

Child in the shade of an Agave plant, Atzcapotzalco, Mexico, 1916

Post with 5747 views. Child in the shade of an Agave plant, Atzcapotzalco, Mexico, 1916

Tonacacihuatl’s themes are ghosts, death and hope. Her symbols are flowers and all symbols of death.  In Mexico this Goddess’s name means ‘Our Lady of Flesh’. Tonacacihuatl is a creatrix who gives life to all things and to whom the spirits of children return at death.

Goddess Tonacacihuatl

Behind the piece: Mictecacihuatl - Goddess of the dead in Aztec mythology. According to some of the research I did, she is wife of Mictecacihuatl, who i.

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