On October 3, 1904 Mary McLeod Bethune opened a normal and industrial school for African-American girls in Daytona Beach, FL. Started in a rented house with only five students, in less than two years she attracted 250 pupils. By 1916, the school had grown into the Daytona Normal and Industrial Institute and was affiliated with the United Methodist Church. The school merged in 1923 with Cookman Institute for boys located in Jacksonville and became Bethune-Cookman College.

Mary McLeod Bethune founded the Daytona Normal and Industrial School for Negro Girls which is now Bethune-Cookman College in Daytona, Florida.

On This Day 1904:  Mary McLeod Bethune opens her first school for African-American students in Daytona Beach, Florida. The school eventually became Bethune-Cookman University and Bethune went on to become an advisor to President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

Educator and civil rights leader Mary McLeod Bethune was in She founded the Daytona Educational and Industrial Training School, a private school for African-American girls in Daytona Beach, Florida in The school later grew into Bethune-Cookman University.

Mary McLeod Bethune-One of the nation's prominent educators and civil rights leaders, Bethune's political career included appointments to the National Youth Administration by President Franklin D. Roosevelt and as a delegate to the founding conference of the United Nations by President Harry S. Truman. She established a school for girls in Daytona Beach that later became Bethune-Cookman College.

Mary McLeod Bethune, Educator and Civil Rights Activist. Division of Library and Information Services. Black History Month: Resources for Strudents and Educators

Dr. Mary McLeod Bethune and Albert McLeod Bethune, Jr. pose at Metropolitan AME Church, February 12, 1940 Photo credit: Getty Images/Afro Newspaper/Gado  Albert McLeod Bethune, Jr. and Mary McLeod Bethune reenactor Photo credit: Mary McLeod Bethune Foundation National Historic Landmark

Dr. Mary McLeod Bethune and Albert McLeod Bethune, Jr. pose at Metropolitan AME Church, February 12, 1940 Photo credit: Getty Images/Afro Newspaper/Gado Albert McLeod Bethune, Jr. and Mary McLeod Bethune reenactor Photo credit: Mary McLeod Bethune Foundation National Historic Landmark

'I Leave You Love:' Powerful Legacy to African Americans from Mary McLeod Bethune

'I Leave You Love:' Powerful Legacy to African Americans from Mary McLeod Bethune. Going on my classroom door this week.

Mrs. Mary McLeod Bethune, 1949. African American civil rights activist and educator who founded the Daytona Normal and Industrial Institute for Negro Girls.

Mary McLeod Bethune, African American civil rights activist and educator who founded the Daytona Normal and Industrial Institute for Negro Girls.

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Mary McLeod Bethune A relative descendant of hers will be on Our show this evening. R/T & Share the timeline for details!

Mary McLeod Bethune: educator, stateswoman, and Civil Rights Activist. A friend of Eleanor Roosevelt who worked on FDR's presidential campaign, helped him reach the black community - who had traditionally been Republican  voters - and joined FDR and Eleanor's Black Cabinet after his election in 1933.

Mary McLeod Bethune: Her 1949 Historic Awards

Mary McLeod Bethune: Very few people realize that in 1949 Mary McLeod Bethune received two historic awards. The Haitian Medal of Honor & Merit & The Commander of the Order of the Star of Africa.

Mary Jane McLeod Bethune, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, April 6, 1949      Born  (1875-07-10)July 10, 1875  Mayesville, South Carolina, United States      Died  May 18, 1955 (aged 79)  Daytona Beach, Florida, United States      Occupation  Educator, Author, and African American Civil Rights Leader      Spouse  Albertus Bethune, died 1918

Mary McLeod Bethune of Barbara Scotia College was an educator and civil rights leader. She is best known for starting a school for African-American students in Daytona Beach, Florida, that eventually became Bethune-Cookman University.

+~+~ Antique Photograph ~+~+  Mary McLeod Bethune was born in Mayesville, South Carolina, the 15th of 17th children. Her parents, Samuel and Patsy McLeod, and her oldest brothers and sisters, were slaves before emancipation when the Union won the Civil War. In her early years, she picked cotton and attended a Methodist mission school.

+~+~ Antique Photograph ~+~+ Mary McLeod Bethune was born in Mayesville, South Carolina, the of children. Her parents, Samuel and Patsy McLeod, .

Dr. Mary McLeod Bethune and Albert McLeod Bethune, Jr. pose at Metropolitan AME Church, February 12, 1940 Photo credit: Getty Images/Afro Newspaper/Gado  Albert McLeod Bethune, Jr. and Mary McLeod Bethune reenactor Photo credit: Mary McLeod Bethune Foundation National Historic Landmark

Dr. Mary McLeod Bethune and Albert McLeod Bethune, Jr. pose at Metropolitan AME Church, February 12, 1940 Photo credit: Getty Images/Afro Newspaper/Gado Albert McLeod Bethune, Jr. and Mary McLeod Bethune reenactor Photo credit: Mary McLeod Bethune Foundation National Historic Landmark

Mary McLeod Bethune.  After struggling to balance school with working on a plantation to help support her family, Bethune went on to become an educator herself, founding the Daytona Educational and Industrial Institute for girls in 1904.

Mary McLeod Bethune. After struggling to balance school with working on a plantation to help support her family, Bethune went on to become an educator herself, founding the Daytona Educational and Industrial Institute for girls in 1904.

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