The embroidery decorations after the renovation of the Juanqin Studio, Forbidden City, China

Luxurious Palace In Forbidden City Is Renovated

♒ Enchanting Embroidery ♒ embroidered decorations after the renovation of the Juanqin Studio, Forbidden City, China

Chinese embroidery textiles flower

Full Square Diamond DIY Diamond Painting "Blooming and wealthy" Embroidery Cross Stitch Rhinestone Mosaic Painting Home Decor

Dragonfly Treasure: Traditional Chinese Embroidery Patterns

From our friends at Dover Publications I thought I'd change things up a little ♥

From a fragment of Chinese embroidery from the Qing Dynasty (circa 1870), likely part of a skirt panel.#ChineseTextiles

The design in the upper left is a bat. It's a traditional design. From a fragment of Chinese embroidery from the Qing Dynasty (circa likely part of a skirt panel.

chinese emb. studio, the work is done with hand dyed silk, on silk organza, this technique was started when they used silk organza as screening on movable frames in the windows during summer to keep out insects, and women began emb. the actual scene that the widow framed...the goal to make the emb. as realistic as the viewed landscape....glorious!!!

Patrick Dowdey, PhD, "Metamorphis, the Collaboration Between Photographer Robert Glenn Ketchum and the Suzhou Embroiderers"

This is a reproduction of an antique embroidery panel, the stitch methods are unique and only several Chinese artists are able to do this

Reproduction of antique embroidery panel - stitch methods are unique, only several Chinese artists are able to do!

Detail of silk embroidery on antique Chinese robe

When I was in the Seattle Asian Art Museum recently, I saw this detail of antique Chinese embroidery of ocean waves that I thought you might enjoy.

The chinese knot is flatter than the French knot, more shapely, not so twisted. In Chinese embroideries it's seldom used as isolated stitch but generally massed together, often covering large areas.

Scroll down for Pekinese Stitch :D The chinese knot is flatter than the French knot, more shapely, not so twisted. In Chinese embroideries it's seldom used as isolated stitch but generally massed together, often covering large areas.

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